Posts Tagged ‘TSHRM’

The Power of Open Decision Framework and Diversity of Thought

Allison McMurray, Senior Director, Global Talent Center of Excellence at Red Hat presented the Open Decision Framework of Decision Making and Project Management at our February 2017 TSRM meeting

As a SHRM (Society of Human Resource Management) member of two local chapters (Raleigh-Wake and Triangle SHRM in the Raleigh – Durham, NC area) I attend as many of these chapters meetings as I can. And when there is a fascinating and useful presentation, especially if it intersects with my consulting areas of diversity and career development, I will write a short blog about it.

On February 16, 2017, I attended such a session at that month’s TSHRM meeting, titled “Open Sesame! The Power of Open-Source Decisions.” Allison McMurray, Senior Director, Global Talent Center of Excellence at Red Hat presented the Open Decision Framework of Decision Making and Project Management.

A few years ago, I heard Red Hat CEO and President Jim Whitehurst speaking at a session on Corporate Social Responsibility, and he offered Red Hat’s commitment to “open sourcing” as a prime example that aligns with community efforts to provide free access to important information and applications. Link to my blog about that session. Allison McMurray at the TSHRM session followed up with the Open Decision Framework as a proven process within Red Hat that is now documented and available for anyone to use. Link to Open Decision Framework on GitHub.

The Key Elements of Open Decision Framework include:

Open Exchange. This includes leading with transparency, publishing work as it proceeds, setting expectations up front, and managing those expectations along the way.

Participation. It is crucial to engage customers and stakeholders early and often. Effective participation includes making it safe to voice concerns, and being specific about what feedback you are looking for.

Releasing Early and Often. This means as the project progresses, publishing progress openly. That includes showing how feedback was used in shaping the project direction, and being open about ongoing expectations around requirements and constraints.

Meritocracy. The best idea wins no matter where and who it came from. This truly encourages everyone to contribute.

Community. That a team can truly accomplish more together

I believe it is very easy to see that using this framework for managing any project would increase its probability of success.

The Open Decision Framework strongly supports one of the emerging sub-fields of diversity and inclusion, Diversity of Thought. Companies are now looking beyond diversity of appearance and to diversity in ways of thinking. When companies open themselves to diverse approaches to business problems and developing solutions, often a blended solution which includes different ideas results in a much stronger answer. When an enterprise is comprised of leaders who all think exactly alike, there is a huge potential for missing entire market segments and innovative products and offerings. Embracing diversity of thought includes listening to others and keeping an open mind to creativity and innovation.

This “Open Decision Framework” is an excellent execution of Diversity of Thought, and I encourage all my blog readers to get more information about it and look at building a cultural shift to project management at your enterprise.

My “Get Up” Blog for March – Getting Up after “Career Falls”

When corporate culture where he worked shifted away from Val Boston’s business philosophy, he “got up” to start his own consultant practice where he could be true to his values.

For the March blog as part of my monthly “Get Up” Blog series inspired by US Figure Skating’s “Get Up” campaign, I am featuring people getting up, not from from physical falls, but from “falls” or unexpected downturns in vocations and careers. The “Get Up” message inspires us to get up from the many different types of falls we can have in our lives just as figure skaters get up and continue after a fall on the very hard cold ice.

I have four short stories to share:


Adult figure skater Shauna Lynn Panczyszyn shared: “I moved to my current city for a job that sought me out. They had made promises that they didn’t keep, and hired someone else to share my position without telling me a week after I started. Three and a half months later they fired me with absolutely no explanation. But I “got up” and dove head first into full time freelance illustration (link to her website) and haven’t looked back. Four years later it is the best thing that could have happened to me, AND I was able to fit skating into my day. Before that, I would have to travel an hour to another rink (my current was just across the street from where I live and I could only skate weekends there) just to get some ice time after work IF I didn’t get stuck working late.


After moving internationally and discovering that her past experience was not really valued in the US, Noa Ronan had to get up and forge her own path as a coach and consultant.


A consultant I met at my local SHRM (Society of Human Resource Management) chapter – Triangle SHRM here in North Carolina, Noa Ronan of Noa Ronen Coaching,, shared, “11 years ago I moved from Israel to the US. I had a fulfilling executive career as a change management consultant and HR and Training executive. But after our family relocation to the US reality hit me, neither my Israeli career experience nor my MBA from Israel was of interest in the US when I applied for jobs. I felt very lost and stuck; I didn’t want to apply for jobs that will take me back to what I did ten years ago or go in a different direction. I loved what I did and I didn’t want to let go of who I was in my past. It took me few good years to fall and fail again and again until I was able to “get up” and let go of the story I was telling myself about my “glorious” past and recreate who I want to be right here in the present. Today I am using all the skills I have acquired over my career with new ones, and I coach global leaders and people in transitions. Letting go of my past was about being present with my new reality and recreating a new future for myself.


And from a highly respected consultant who has been an invaluable mentor to me as I started my own business in 2010, Val Boston of Boston and Associates, LLC: “After 5 years with a global organization, they were sold to a much larger firm. With the acquisition came a major cultural and philosophical shift, from a service focus model to a more “bottom line” one. This change in business philosophy was in direct conflict with mine. I then I “got up” and decided to launch my own consultancy focusing on Diversity & Inclusion, and Leadership Coaching. That was 17 years ago!”


And another friend from TSHRM who is so supportive of my figure skating journey, Diane Olsen (link to her LinkedIn profile) shares her story of “getting up” multiple times: “After ten years building an amazing insurance industry career, where I climbed ladders, I turned down the ultimate promotion at a very large company. I decided to move cross country and go back to school, but soon found myself in a financial position where I needed to go back to work full time. I grabbed the first job that came along. When that company shut down, I job-jumped a few times while trying to finish my degree part-time. I had a roller coaster on my resume now.

Then it dawned on me that I created this storm. What was I going to be when I grew up? I didn’t get my answer until years later. I took a job in Raleigh as an Operations Manager for a start-up company, and I was employee number nine. Over the course of eight years, I built four other departments, was promoted to VP of Operations and HR, and was able to be a part of the buy-out of the company at the end of 2015. Each of these departments I created had information pulled from a lot of the in-between jobs I’d had in the past.

Sometimes, you are dusting yourself off without even realizing it. I have since left that job, taking a well-deserved hiatus. It’s a bit stressful being in transition, but exciting at the same time. Needless to say, I look forward to “getting up” and starting my next adventure with open arms.


Life, like the ice, can be very hard, with falls giving us a good jar. But we can rise up, persevere, and move onto something better.

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Links to all my earlier “Get Up” monthly blogs can be found on my skating blogs and videos blog page.

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