Posts Tagged ‘open sourcing’

The Power of Open Decision Framework and Diversity of Thought

Allison McMurray, Senior Director, Global Talent Center of Excellence at Red Hat presented the Open Decision Framework of Decision Making and Project Management at our February 2017 TSRM meeting

As a SHRM (Society of Human Resource Management) member of two local chapters (Raleigh-Wake and Triangle SHRM in the Raleigh – Durham, NC area) I attend as many of these chapters meetings as I can. And when there is a fascinating and useful presentation, especially if it intersects with my consulting areas of diversity and career development, I will write a short blog about it.

On February 16, 2017, I attended such a session at that month’s TSHRM meeting, titled “Open Sesame! The Power of Open-Source Decisions.” Allison McMurray, Senior Director, Global Talent Center of Excellence at Red Hat presented the Open Decision Framework of Decision Making and Project Management.

A few years ago, I heard Red Hat CEO and President Jim Whitehurst speaking at a session on Corporate Social Responsibility, and he offered Red Hat’s commitment to “open sourcing” as a prime example that aligns with community efforts to provide free access to important information and applications. Link to my blog about that session. Allison McMurray at the TSHRM session followed up with the Open Decision Framework as a proven process within Red Hat that is now documented and available for anyone to use. Link to Open Decision Framework on GitHub.

The Key Elements of Open Decision Framework include:

Open Exchange. This includes leading with transparency, publishing work as it proceeds, setting expectations up front, and managing those expectations along the way.

Participation. It is crucial to engage customers and stakeholders early and often. Effective participation includes making it safe to voice concerns, and being specific about what feedback you are looking for.

Releasing Early and Often. This means as the project progresses, publishing progress openly. That includes showing how feedback was used in shaping the project direction, and being open about ongoing expectations around requirements and constraints.

Meritocracy. The best idea wins no matter where and who it came from. This truly encourages everyone to contribute.

Community. That a team can truly accomplish more together

I believe it is very easy to see that using this framework for managing any project would increase its probability of success.

The Open Decision Framework strongly supports one of the emerging sub-fields of diversity and inclusion, Diversity of Thought. Companies are now looking beyond diversity of appearance and to diversity in ways of thinking. When companies open themselves to diverse approaches to business problems and developing solutions, often a blended solution which includes different ideas results in a much stronger answer. When an enterprise is comprised of leaders who all think exactly alike, there is a huge potential for missing entire market segments and innovative products and offerings. Embracing diversity of thought includes listening to others and keeping an open mind to creativity and innovation.

This “Open Decision Framework” is an excellent execution of Diversity of Thought, and I encourage all my blog readers to get more information about it and look at building a cultural shift to project management at your enterprise.

Ignite Talks – Local Leaders as Social Innovators

Please do notice and use the many bolded underlined hot links to additional information on the internet!

Kevin McDonald, founder and CEO of TROSA, was the second speaker of the Ignite series

Kevin McDonald, founder and CEO of TROSA, was the second speaker of the Ignite series


This Fall, I have started to attend a unique innovative series called the “Ignite Talks” offered by the Levin Jewish Community Center in Durham, North Carolina. Ignite is a networking and educational forum offered to members of our local community. Through talks and interviews with business and community leaders, the series provides a unique venue to promote social responsibility, community building and continuing education.

The first two sessions could not have offered two more contrasting, different speakers: one a Harvard MBA and CEO of a major technology firm, and the other a high school graduate who spent many years as a drug addict living on the streets before starting a successful impactful community organization. And though these two men appear to be polar opposites, they both offered the consistent message on how leaders can make a profound, positive impact on communities and the world.

Jim Whitehurst, CEO and President of Red Hat spoke on September 17, 2013, on “The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility in Building a High Performing Culture.” Two of his main points:
1. It has to go beyond simply writing a check – that is too easy. It is important to find participatory ways to engage in community volunteerism. And corporate leaders should be role models and set an example by participating in active, visible community efforts.
2. Corporations that promote community involvement should do so in ways that will resonate and connect with their employees and that are aligned with their corporate mission. He offered an example of Red Hat’s commitment to “open sourcing” that aligns with community efforts to provide free access to important information and applications.

Kevin McDonald along with other TROSA staff and the TROSA clients, training to work in the food industry and serving that morning's breakfast

Kevin McDonald along with other TROSA staff and the TROSA clients, training to work in the food industry and serving that morning’s breakfast


Kevin McDonald, founder and CEO of TROSA (Triangle Residential Options for Substance Abusers), spoke on November 12, 2013. TROSA is the largest residential substance-abuse treatment program in North Carolina in North Carolina and a model of social entrepreneurship. After narrating his own personal journey, Kevin shared about the TROSA business model, which connects with the community and develops program graduates who gain skills to make a positive impact on the community through jobs and community service. TROSA’s intense two-year program has an extremely low relapse rate (15%) compared to national averages. Kevin applied the hard lessons he learned on the streets of Los Angeles with his intense commitment to community and people to start and build this very successful program.

So Jim Whitehurst and Kevin McDonald come from two extremely different environments, but both are leading for positive community impact within their spheres. This demonstrates to all us, that no matter our backgrounds nor vocation, we can each align our personal passions and the current environment we are in to ignite impact on our communities.

Link here for more information on the Ignite Series and to enroll, support and attend.

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