Posts Tagged ‘mature workers’

Five Tips and Best Practices for Engaging Senior Talent Through Job Sharing – Part 2

Rev Elder Dr. Nancy Wilson and Rev. Vickie Miller are two experienced pastors featured in the job sharing case study in part 1 of this blog.

Many of us continue to read about the growing labor shortage across the US, especially as the number of younger trained professionals entering the workforce is far less that the huge numbers of retiring “baby boomers” born between 1946 – 1965. One way of addressing this shortage is better utilization of the mature worker, many who may not be ready for full retirement.

Great ways of utilizing this excellent source of skilled resource is part time work or sharing a full time position between two or more part time mature workers. In part 1 of this series, I presented a case study of a church in Florida which recently hired two part-time pastors to fill what was initially publicized as a single full time senior pastor position.

Please read part 1 – this interview with Rev. Dr. Nancy Wilson, one of the pastors who took half of this senior pastor job.

Now I would like to offer five tips / best practices / advantages for hiring two part people to fill one full time position, the first four coming from the case study shared in the blog part 1:

1) Seek complementary skills from the two candidates. Take advantage of this opportunity of getting two people for the price of one. When hiring one single person, you may often need to weigh each candidate’s strengths and weaknesses to another, but with two people, you can bring in two different sets of skills and also cover the weaknesses one person may have.

2) Do make sure that both people can team well and work together. In some cases, the two candidates may have a prior working or personal relationship and know they can work together. In other cases, you may need to interview the two candidates together and also contact references to specifically discuss how well each person works with others.
3) Realize that the cost may be a little more than the original budget for the one person. Often mature experienced workers will required a somewhat higher pay than an inexperienced person, and each may want to work a little more than 20 hours a week. But you may also save some on benefits (employees over 65 could be on Medicare), and you will probably get a lot more value in terms of knowledge, hard work and dedication from these employees

4) Have a plan in place in case one of the pair leaves or retires. You could ask that each person give you two months notice before leaving as part of the agreement to give you time to backfill. You could also ask the remaining part timer to work full time temporarily to pick up the slack, and also involve them in the hiring process of the new “second half.”

5) In addition to seeking outside candidates, consider the mature workers you currently have on board. Some may welcome a shared part time position as an ideal transition between working full time and full time retirement.

Do think creatively! I do hope this two part series is both inspirational and practical in terms of addressing alternatives to employment resources.

Generational Diversity – Are Your Recruiting Methodologies “Up to Date?”

IMPORTANT NOTE: (This session is being postponed until later in the year.) The newly formed Triangle Chapter of the National Diversity Council – Carolinas is holding its first half day conference, the Generational Diversity Summit on February 19th! It’s going to be a great event – link here for info and to enroll. Email brian.richards@nationaldiversitycouncil.org for corporate sponsorship opportunities.

Many millenials prefer informal working spaces where they can multitask and team

Many millenials prefer informal working spaces where they can multitask and team


Generational Diversity continues to be one of the hottest most discussed areas in the continually evolving field of workplace diversity and inclusion. In a blog I published in June, 2012 on the “Growing Various Types of Diversity,” I led with a discussion on the four generations now in the workplace. This is an historic happening as mature workers (link to a blog on this) are staying in the workplace longer due to financial needs, better health, and the desire to stay active and intellectually stimulated. Here also is a link to a 2.5 minute video excerpt I did on Generational Diversity.

The group now being recruited on our college campuses are referred to as “Millennials”, those born after 1982. This emerging generation has very different views on communications in the workplace, important attributes of a vocation, collaboration, corporate hierarchies and more. Here is a link to a recent article from Forbes called “10 Ways Millennials are Creating the Future of Work.”

One area that needs focus at many of our companies is recruiting. How do we find, attract and hire the brightest new talent? Of course we should not forget to recruit the experienced professional who may be looking for a job change, but as always, college campuses will continue to provide the largest talent pool of new workers.

On the whole, recruiting methodology has not changed very much over the past 30-40 years. Yes, resumes are sent electronically and placed in on-line repositories instead of mailed, and job postings are online in addition to print ads, but overall the process involves recruiters reading through thousands of pages of boring text resumes. How can this be innovated?

At a recent generational diversity workshop sponsored by the Raleigh-Wake Human Resources Mgt Association (RWHRMA) Link, Margaret Gordy, Talent Acquisition Manager for Citrix, shared innovative ways that her company is identifying and recruiting top talent. Citrix (link), an industry leader for collaborative workplace solutions such as the popular “Go To Meeting,” teams with university classes, clubs and professors to engage students in collaborative problem solving. Teams work together to propose solutions to actual Citrix business challenges developed by Citrix business areas. This gives Citrix managers a way to evaluate technical, problem solving, and team skills of potential candidates. Those demonstrating the strongest skills are often offered an internship, a full time job, or at minimum a fast-path into the job interview process.

Advantages of this approach over hours of pouring through resume paperwork include:
• Candidates with the best skills and team work abilities who will fit best into Citrix’s workplace are identified.
• Candidates can experience the Citrix culture and both the candidate and company can assure a good “corporate culture fit.”

Overall, companies that successfully recruit top talent across all generations and keep them engaged working cross-generationally will win in the competitive, global marketplace.

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