Archive for February 2016

Lessons in Character from a Young Teen

2016 US Figure Skating Nationals Novice Champion and subject of this blog Eric Sjoberg (left) and Junior Champion Tomoki Hiwatashi (right) at the Friends of Figure Skating breakfast following the competition.

2016 US Figure Skating Nationals Novice Champion and subject of this blog Eric Sjoberg (left) and Junior Champion Tomoki Hiwatashi (right) at the Friends of Figure Skating breakfast following the competition.

How would you handle dropping from second place to second from the bottom?

OK, many of my blog readers and followers know that I like to add some items now and then about my favorite pastime, figure skating. When I retired and started my own business, I had the time and flexibility to start attending the US Figure Skating Nationals, which I have done the past seven years. And then at age 59, I decided to take up the sport myself and am training to compete with older adults. (See my blog “Finding a New Passion at Age 59.”)

And not only do I attend the “senior” events (these are the people we see on television and who go to the Olympics), but I stay the entire week to see the young up and coming skaters who will be our Olympians in 2018 or 2022.
Below the senior level are the junior and novice divisions.

The novice skaters are most often between 12 – 15 years old and are the top 12 who finish the top four of their sectionals in the east, central and west United States.

One of my favorites is a young skater named Eric Sjoberg, who I first saw in 2014 when he was one of the youngest competitors in novice at age 12. This small 5 foot tall guy had wonderful choreography and beautiful hand movements and won the silver medal. It was also fun sitting in the stands next to his excited and nervous parents.

I looked forward to seeing Eric the next year as he competed again in novice. He grew 8 inches in one year and was having a hard time adjusting to his new body. He struggled in his programs and instead of finishing one from the top like the previous year, he finished one from the bottom – yes – 11th out of 12.

Most of us would probably quit right then. It is very disappointing to go from the top to the bottom. I spoke to him and his mother Sandra afterwards and encouraged Eric to keep up his training and not to give up because he had such a natural talent.

And Eric did not. He showed great character and fortitude as a young teen and worked harder than ever the next year. I came to US Nationals in St. Paul, MN in January of this year, anticipating what Eric would show us this year. His long program was far superior to all competitors and he won the gold medal in Novice. He adjusted to his growth spurt and completed seven triple jumps in his program with a new maturity and power. Link here to watch his program on youtube. (I am the fan that threw the dog he is holding in kiss and cry as he awaits his score.)

So we can we learn from Eric? First, to not give up when we go from the top of the heap to the bottom. Instead work even harder with renewed determination. And second, as things change, adjust and build on our new assets. Eric was able to use his new height and weight to add strong athletic jumps to his earlier artistic flare to deliver an excellent competitive program.

As Eric continues to work hard, I look forward to seeing this young athlete representing the US on the world stage and Olympics in future years.

Diversity and Straight White Men – 4 Key Thoughts

This groups certainly does not look very diverse and is not indicative of today's diverse business environment.

This groups certainly does not look very diverse and is not indicative of today’s diverse business environment.

Diversity and Straight White Men – this topic indeed does deserve some discussion. How do straight white men fit into the diversity and inclusion discussion?

So often straight white men may feel left out or marginalized in diversity and inclusion discussions. Some may even feel that they are be targeted as “the diversity problem” or feel under appreciated or even discriminated against. I would like to offer 4 points for consideration, and have added links to two related online articles at the end.

1. You are diverse as a straight white man! Every single person in an organization is diverse and unique, and brings their own special mix of background and experience to the table. Though some people may view straight white men as a monolithic group, there is a huge mix of diversity including age, marital / family status, education, thought processes,economic upbringing, etc.

2. Accept your privilege. White men (and I am one of them) need to realize that we have been in control of most of the organizational leadership and processes in the US. It has been easier for us to progress into senior leadership within a system with the incumbent leadership looking like us. We now need to accept that with a wider pool of diverse candidates now getting their fair shot at leadership, we truly must be the best qualified to deserve that next promotion.

3. Realize that straight white men face their own diversity challenges. For example, as both parents are now take a stronger role in raising families, some managers may still excuse a woman when she needs to leave work early to pick up a sick child at school, but look down at a man with the same request as “less than” and questioning why his wife does not pick up the child. And there are also single fathers, men with responsibility for aging parents, etc., that need strong work-life balance practices without feeling that they are somehow “less manly.”

A white male business leader can be an active diversity ally by mentoring a diverse set of employees.

A white male business leader can be an active diversity ally by mentoring a diverse set of employees.

4. Be a strong active diversity ally. We need to reject any thoughts or discussion that white men are the cause of diversity issues. Instead, we can take the lead and be a major ally to promote diversity and inclusion as a critical strategic initiative within our organizations. We can mentor diverse candidates and help insure they have full access to the tools to help them get head and contribute their maximum to the organization. And we can network among our own peers and speak passionately about the value of diversity.

Yes, I know many people may disagree or not even like this blog, but dialogue on diversity items like this are important. In fact, here are two more in depth articles you can read on this subject, I may not agree with them and instead make my above 4 points, but it is always good to consider all aspects of a complex discussion:

I thank my business partner Marie-Louise Murville of Delight Me for sending me the Washington Post article, “Workplace diversity policies don’t help – and make white men feel threatened.”

And one I found via LinkedIn, “Diversity Talk Makes White Men Anxious, and Other Reasons Diversity Programs Fail.”

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